One of my favorite bands of all time is Chicago. And one of my favorite Chicago songs is Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?

Do you know?

Here’s a four-word question: What time is it? That is a relatively easy question because we all have a watch, phone or clock on the wall to tell us the time.

Robert Lamm (keyboard player and singer for Chicago) wrote a song about the time of day titled 25 or 6 to 4. It’s about trying to write a song, with the title referring to the time of day: either 3:35 a.m. (25 to 4) or 3:34 a.m. (26 to 4).

Lamm explained on The Chris Isaak Hour: “I was living with a bunch of hippies up above Sunset Strip. One of the advantages of this particular house was that it was in the Hollywood Hills and I could look out over the city late at night. I wanted to try to describe the process of writing the song that I was writing. So, ‘waiting for the break of day, searching for something to say, flashing lights against the sky’ – there was a neon sign across the city. That song came from the fact that it was 25 or 6 to 4am in the morning when I looked at my watch – I was looking for a line to finish the chorus.” (This passage is a quote from www.songfacts.com.)

Of course it is important to know the time of day. There are times when knowing, or not knowing, the time of day could change your life.

But what if I used the same four words and asked a completely different question – Time, what is it?

How do you define time?

The best definition I’ve heard concerning time is from Ben Franklin: “Do not squander time, for that is the stuff life is made of.”

I have two questions for you.

  1. What time is it? Is it time for you to take action in some area of your life or business which needs attention? Is it time for you to do some planning? Is it time for you to have a conversation with someone you should have had days, weeks or even months ago? What time is it for you?
  2. Time, what is it to you? Take a minute and think about that one, then write your response below. Your comment may be the key to help someone have an epiphany that could change their life.